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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)
franklin. after katrina, you were a native of new orleans, you were appointed the vice chairman of the louisiana recovery authority and the job was to handle funds that were being disbursed by the federal government. in watching the rebuilding of new orleans and this whole process, what do you think that you learned that applies to what's going on now in new york and new jersey? >> three things. first of all, leadership matters. if you look at what's happening in new york and new jersey now organization view great leaders, michael bloomberg, deputy mayor bob steele, governor cuomo, governor chris christie. the president, obama, has been very involved. when we went through katrina, we were all back down in new orleans, it wasn't that strong of leadership. ray nagin was the mayor, sometimes not to be found. so i saw the importance of people who take charge and say i'm going to run into this crisis and i'm going to help solve it. secondly, it reminded us that we're all in the same boat together. this election is somewhat about the age-old tension between, all right, we're all indiv
oceanic and not mr. association, the costliest storms to hit katrina by one at funk shot. take, about 30 billion. andrew in 90 to about 36.5 billion. wilma in 2005, i've been 18 billion, charlie indo for 15 billion, reader, frances and jeanne all and hurricane damage. in your view, does the national flood insurance program currently structured work? >> i think it does work. it does help protect consumers from an uninsurable event in the private arcade. the program was created in 1968 was the result created because the private market could not accurately and in suitably underrate the insurance risk. so what was happening was people were completely without flood insurance protection. so is happening in the 60s and 50s as american citizens were being flooded and the only recourse that she had was federal disaster assistance after the fact. so the program was created to have people pay into a program and be prepared for storm and a flood event before it happened. now, it certainly could use improvement. you know, there are critics out there whose fate is is too subsidized by the federal gove
the cuban missile crisis, 9/11, katrina, those were events that felt like the world were coming. there are people that are worried about other kinds of doomsdays and they plan on surviving. >> it looks like in has been another series of attacks, cyber attacks on united states banks. >> bill: recent cyber attacks could have doomsday style consequences. that has our government concerned. >> attackers could also seek to disable or degrade critical military systems and communication networks. collective result of these kinds of attacks could be a cyber pearl harbor. >> we have an insane regime in iran run by people who are psychotic who may get the nuclear weaponry to act on their insane thoughts. that means we could have a nuclear holocaust. >> what we depict on our show they have a variety they are concerned about. everything from tsunami to a nuclear blast. >> a koe executive producer of doomsday preppers. >> there are three touch stones. first touch stone is 9/11. second touch stone is destruction of american cities which is katrina. third touch stone is the financial collapse.
katrina days and now we hear good things about the matter. neil: you can say we are on top of something. but generally, itimplies you're telling the truth. so if you're going to make a speech to say things are good, well, things better be good. because otherwise, you are lying. doesn't that ring true for ths staten island resident who joins usn the phone. marianne, how are things going? >> things are not any better, neil. still the same in staten island. we were abandoned yesterday. with that nor'easter came in, fema closes their doors due to weather conditions. over a week since the storm. neil: what is the relief center supposed to do? >> are you talking about fema? neil: the fema center. >> it gives people in staten island to go there and talk to representatives and people. there is a gn on the door that says that fema is close to the weatherford really? that's what they're telling people? these are people that don't have any homes, electricity or lights and no ple to go. they are put out of their houses. and then they go to a fema center and they are closed due to the weather. it's
surpass the cost of hurricane katrina which stood $110 billion. when you look at the numbers, basically the power outages in the region from hurricane sandy are about two times more power outages versus what we saw in hurricane katrina. when it comes to the number of homes destroyed, 50% more homes destroid in hurricane sandy versus hurricane katrina cat. hurricane katrina claimed for lives. 1866 people were killed by hurricane katrina. versus 185 deaths from hurricane sandy. destruction and damage governor cuomo may have it right. as to who pays for it? ordinarily the u.s. government picks up 75% of the tab for restoring government services including things like mass transit. as for now both governor cuomo and governor christie of new jersey are saying wait a second we want the federal government to pick up even more of the tab possibly 90% to 100%. governor cuomo is pretty pointed whether or not he will let his state's taxpayers pay any of the costs. here is governor cuomo. >> to try to finance through taxes, would incapacitate the state. my philosophy hasn't changed. tax increases ar
to the northeast. pay back for all the help they got after hurricane katrina. >> we wanted to reach out and help them like some people helped us. >> shepard: tonight, all aboard the train of hope. but first from fox this monday night, pillow talk and national security. fox news confirms or has confirmed that the cia found classified documents on the computer that belongs to paula broadwell. she is the woman who had an affair with the then cia david petraeus. there is nothing to indicate that these documents actually came from general petraeus himself. the general stepped down as the cia director last friday but questions remain about whether his once secret lover knew information she should not have known. prince, consider paula broadwell's comments during a speech in denver last month during which she spoke about the attack on our consulate in benghazi, libya. >> i don't know if a lot of you heard this but the cia annex had actually taken a couple of libyan militia members prisoner they think the attack on the consulate was to try to get these prisoners back. it's still being vetted. >> shepard
katrina. and i expect the people of this state to be treated with the same level of compassion and generosity that the citizens of louisiana and mississippi and alabama were treated in the aftermath of hurricane katrina. >> michael graham told me out on staten island as well. more than half a million households are still without power. 40,000 homes on the rockaway peninsulas. deb fayerick is there and how angry are people? >> people are so frustrated and angry. it's been only 12 days since the storm hit. you're not too far from jfk. that light is basically illuminating a corner. that means there's no heat. boilers can't work. there are no washer triers, no way to charge a cell phone. no way to use a computer to access any sort of outside help, so they feel they're just being cut off here and they cannot understand why atlantic power authority, which is a state-owned company, can't get the lights on. we spoke earlier to couple of people at a rally and they were so frustrated. take a listen. >> restore the power to our community now! now! we're done! >> you know, and you just, yo
. >> guest: i know what he is referring to which katrina with uncertainty about what caused the structural damage. with katrina you have a lot of houses and structures wiped out the only thing left was a slab of concrete. it was very difficult to determine if the damage was caused by the wind or swept away by the storm surge or the flood. there was a lot of controversy wind versus water. that is important if it is caused by water then the nfip picks up the tab if it is wind than it is private insurance. this storm i don't anticipate being that much controversy surrounding the issue because based on the footage of his team there has not been widespread slab total loss properties that katrina had. in the storm i think there will be a better opportunity for the adjusters to use the scientific process look at the storm comment damage, water wobbles they can determine whether it was caused by water or wind. that is my hope. >> host: mr. prible with municipal damage in new york subway system are they ensured through a private broker? >> guest: new york city from what i read your understand they
who thought that katrina could never happen here. but it has happened. and as they pump the tunnels and open the subways, iconic landmarks are twisted and broken, and still we find bodies, and revise upward the count of the dead. and now frustration and fear of the future haunt many, as homeowners scramble to salvage whatever is left and ask when the pain and suffering will stop. and to the long gaslines and impassable roads, broken infrastructure, and lost hours of work and schools, add this weather alert. to those living without power in those houses comes word that the temperatures are cooling. down to the low 30s for tonight, and for the next several nights. and much worse than the cold. another nor easter, another wet and windy storm this way comes. >> and bad weather, ladies and gentlemen, the last thing the battered burrough of stat ten eileen need. let's fine out what else mother now has in store. meteorologist justin poric, what's going on? >> well, geraldo, this is the last thing that residents of in the northeast want to think about, a potential storm. this will not be sa
they are clarifying. do you think fema has done a better response with this disaster as it did to katrina, tammy i'll start with you? >> i think years have gone by unlike l.a. earthquakes and there is no warning i think what it shows that a bureaucracy is not going to perform well. we knew this was coming. we knew the first weekend they ran out of the water and unprepared. the people of staten island are still living in a disaster area. they pointed to all the money they spent that is accomplishment. they aren't looking at results. so i don't think this is -- there has been a lot of activity but is the activity actually contributing to making people's lives better wioflt say that the people who are living on staten island and people still without power would not think they are in the best and greatest city of the world and paying the highest taxes in the country. >> given what we have seen in mississippi, i was down there right afterwards, it's a lot better than it was then. i think they actually did do a pretty reasonable job but the issue is what is going to happen in the recovery phase. are the
to katrina and 9/11? >> i work 9/11, logistically it was a recovery operation. logistically the scale is not a comparison. >> it is already a challenge to get garbage and debris and of the peninsula, certainly at long island and when the power gets back up. and the first file created here out of the dozen or so, we are seeing furniture basically personal items from households with a crane is working. >> the walls and mementos and photos, and sitting in these files. >> and white where a plants, the next island boardwalk. >> from the break -- >> the epa, whatever they checking for. and capturing chemicals, we have air monitoring going on with the health department. >> this is a hazardous waste site. >> being closely monitored, on the oversight. >> we have families trying to show up to retrieve personal items. >> people will come in and when they see the scope of what is going on they realize it is over. >> but this is what happens. we are saying on this story, giving live updates. back to you. dagen: terrific reporting. good to see you. connell: as president obama for this area over the
hurricane katrina. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jon: a new proposal from house republicans that would make it easier for green card holders to bring family members to the united states, this after analysts say the issue of immigration played a major role in november's election results. doug mckelway live on capitol hill with that. >> reporter: hey, jon. republicans and supporters of this bill say republicans have to become aware of the demographic shifts which so demonstrated themselves in the november 6th election results, and they have to do it in a way in which they are not presenting themselves as substitute democrats that don't respect border enforcement and the civic disorder that comes with that. they plan to do it thro
, was about the vote on hurricane katrina. there will be all kinds of wasted funds. it is a principled vote and it will be easy to vote on. king was right -- this is the sioux city's response. the balance of that is false. i have had better votes since then. voting against obamacare, voting against cap and trade, dodd-frank, those were better votes, but the rest of those allegations are false. >> he is one of 11 congressmen who took a vote against hurricane katrina relief. i think that everything i said in that ad is true. we have researched all of it. these are congressman king's own words. >> and he is using one to define mrs. vilsack. >> what does it mean if mrs. vilsack calls for tax increases? she is for increasing taxes on job creators and in this stagnant economy, christie vilsack will effect -- hurt job creation. on doesn't have a clue jobs. >> mr. king, you've seen the ad. >> that's the first time i've seen that, but am happy to respond. mrs. vilsack wants the tax increase to kick in on millionares, and many of them are job creators and small businesspeople. >> mrs. vilsack, you've
are competing with us. we came together for sandy, we came together for katrina, we're in a tough spot, and we all need to come together again. shannon: look at you guys agreeing. >> i agree. shannon: i feel a little bipartisan love. that's a great place to leave it. gentlemen, thank you both, and we hope the folks in washington are listening. >> thank you. >> climb buy ya. [laughter] shannon: a troubling new timeline on the deaths of four americans in libya that suggests the pentagon didn't know we were under attack for almost an hour after our ambassador sounded an alarm. pete leg seth next on why that might be, that the pentagon didn't know. >>> and what looks like a joke is now quietly growing in support as hundreds, then thousands of people sign petitions requesting that their individual state secede from the union. we're going to show you who and what is behind this effort. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis sympto. but if you have arthritis, staying a
katrina. bill: that is remarkable. let me get to that in a moment. next we are we can expect more of these. >> that's right. every 11 years the north pole and south pole flip releasing a burst of radiation and hot plasma are shooting into outer space. one of these days one of these bullets could hit the earth. bill: what will happen then? you will lose your blackberry. >> first we'll lose fox news. teltelecommunications will be knocked out. satellites will be fried. this is an unlikely event, power stations could get shorted out. physicists have estimated property damage at the level of $2 trillion or about 20 times the damage of hurricane katrina these numbers were done by the military and by the american physical society. bill: when was the last time that happened. >> you have to go back to 1859 or so. the carryin car shall carrington event. we didn't have satellites back in the 1800s and we've only had a few cycles with the space-age to worry about. power plants have been knocked out in quebec and other cities because of solar flares that graze the earth. a direct hit, though rare could
there. katrina. >> people need to know that we have come one step closer to ending the ineffective irrational and inhumane drug wars with the initiatives that passed in washington and colorado on november 6th. this is an opening for the president to instruct the department of justice to reprioritize the marijuana, prosecution of marijuana cases. but also to use this as a way to allow washington, colorado to implement these cases because the war on drugs disproportionately affects latino, african-americans and it's failed. >> colorado is an -- the story in colorado is fascinating. they're setting up the regulatory system. >> eli lake. people should know that the white house and the cia write the policy that was supposed to endure for drone target, china developed their own military drones that they unveiled this week as a military air show. it's not just america and israel anymore. >> inevitable. heather hole bert. >> people should know as we go back to the fiscal cliff/curve discussions, pentagon contractors, have enough money to ride them out for six months unlike military familie
two republican presidents very badly. both george h.w. bush with hurricane andrew and katrina, of course. so following up on rahm emanuel, he might have thought hurricanes generally play better for democrats in that they require that kind of federal aid. you cannot -- no state, no city can do this on this its own and that was what was poignant with governor christie and president obama. yeah, i think that's true. >> edmund, this was a case of leadership that is perhaps a little bit more like theodore roosevelt than ronald reagan in the sense whether it's krischri or obama, a take-charge attitude. >> appearance matters. they were masters of action on camera. and what the american people relate to, particularly during an election season, is the president in action. and here we've -- if i were running for re-election to the presidency, i would pray for an emergency like this, because we look to our presidents to dram a tiez and to make sense of natural ka as the trophies. theodore roosevelt had the san francisco earthquake to deal with which he greatly enjoyed and reagan had seve
. this was the biggest one-week spike since september of 05 right after hurricane katrina slammed the gulf coast. gerri willis is with us. this jump, you could expect it. >> that's true. it's about the storm. people can file for unemployment claims if their employer closes their doors because of the storm. that's exactly what happened. we saw a lot of people file particularly in new york and new jersey. but even if you look at the moving averages which tends to back that out, you see the numbers moving, drifting higher. this jobs market is not recovered. not yet, not by a long shot. you can probably expect to see this weakness continue for two weeks. >> shep: that led to another -- it was a horrible day on wall street for a while, but recovered at the end. >> yesterday, 185 points down on the dow. today we ended up down 28 points. that's what's considered a good day on the markets right now. let me tell you, with that major problems, and if you look what the markets have done since the president took office, down 5%. the nasdaq, s & p, the dow, all of them. >> shep: it's his fault. obama's fault, right
. >> well, i mean, you know, we had hurricane sandy which disrupted the economy for a period. we had katrina many years ago. things will disrupt the economy. i mean, 9/11 was extraordinary case. but we have a very resilient economy. we had one for hundreds of years and the fact that they can't get along for the month of january is not going to torpedo the economy. >> buffett also told me that the president and congress need to make every attempt possible to reach a compromise and he also said that does not mean that qua yoet roll over and give away the store." again, he wants to see the president take a hard line here. the big part of these negotiate azs is taxes on the wealthy. should tax rates increase or not. we ask buffet for specifics when it comes to taxes, especially taxes on investments or capital gains taxes. here's what he told us. >> we certainly, we certainly prosperred with capital gains rates more than double what they are currently. >> we'd be fine with 30% capital gains. >> sure. >> what about income tax? >> income taxes as high as 90% during my lifetime. now, very few people
orleans to determine their procedures for rebuilding in the aftermath of hurricane katrina. shannon? >> shannon: it's just still so hard to believe. eric, thank you. >>> a possible reprieve for the hostess twinkie. we have just learned that hostess in the second largest union agreed to go to mediation to rethe differences. bankruptcy court judge concluded today that the two parties had not gone through that critical step. >>> the taliban public relations department does a public relations no-no. and did joe biden call president obama a homeboy? grapevine is next. [ male announcer ] what are happy kids made of? bikes and balloons, and noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. a wand, some wings, soup with good things. sidewalks and doodles and wholesome noodles. puddles and pails and yes, puppy dog tails. for a lunch like this, there's a hug and a kiss. because that's what happy kids are made of. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ because that's what happy kids are made of. ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves
plummeted. it washurricane katrina times, up $15, and now it's down torina about $2. it's so cheap and plentiful, but people don't want to sort of embrace the idea this is good for the environment because it is, after all, a fossil fuel.ue. >> it is.t 's not the end of the solution to climate change, but, listen, we have triedor 20 years witho kiota and the e.u. wanted to dod goo.d. we -- i'm from -- we paid $20 billion or $30 billion to cut emissions, and you've done it for free, actually, made moneyyu doing it because you got cheaper energy. that's theth way forward. also, for china and india and everyone else. melissa: proponents of solar and wind don't want to hear is while fracking has been profitable, it's helped the environment, but at the same time, you look at things, like, a big story from w wyoming, why theyh drill, anddrl there's a well that is contaminated one way or the other, and seems like in the repos dealing with this and the neighbors in the neighborhood are saying, and s this is pavilion, wyoming, it's, a result of theracking nearby, and that's a case they point
was chris back in the bush years when hurricane katrina happened? apparently, that has no impact on natural thing. it is all the president's fault back then and now it is not. >> no, how you respond to it that determines whether it is the president's fault. melissa: we've got to go. >> we'll see about that. thanks. melissa: thanks to both for coming on. appreciate your time. refusing to close for superstorm sandy has some businesses thriving. how serving up clients has never paid so well for the owner of one manhattan restaurant. we had to find a silver lining. at the end of the day it is all about money. ♪ follow the wings. melissa: as sandy was ripping across new york city earlier this week most people were hunkered down, hiding out at home until it was over. most people that is but not everyone. a restaurant in manhattan chose to brave the storm and stayed open throughout the entire thing. since they were one of the only places to do so they actually made a killing. leave it to new yorkers to bank on a disaster and make it work. sirio's owner joins me now. thanks for coming on. we've b
, president bush was criticized by both parties when he flew over katrina and didn't stop. so, i think today's show, melissa, would have been if president obama didn't offer to come here, we would be talking about why the president dissed new york, why he didn't offer to go there while he has the state wrapped up politically and doing this for political reasons. he offered to go. the mayor said, hey, we have a lot going on and we're busy and declined that. i think the mayor made a mistake. anytime a president offers to come visit on the ground i think you should take that. that is mayor bloomberg's choice. we disagree on what he did but i understand why he did it. melissa: thank goodness said the little part at the end because all of sudden you weren't on to disagree but i won you over before we start the argument, i don't put beyond the realm of possibility. you would have accepted it if you were in new york city? do you have a monitor near you? do you happen to see, can you put up the traffic again? did you happen to see what is going on? there it is. oh. >> this is not the worst catastrop
overseas in afghanistan and that have served time with katrina down in new orleans, and they said it doesn't look much different. i would agree with them. even just walking around and having it be dead silent and the hising of natural gas coming out of the ground because of broken mains. we are still as of yesterday, still in search and rescue mode trying to make sure that everybody's out of their house and safe. before the -- they allow people to actually come back. it's a very, very frustrating time, but i can tell you kind of what -- you were talking about with ralph -- clive on the earlier call, the people -- i had the opportunity last night to go to some shelters and talk to some people. they are amazed at the amount of people that are willing to help and total strangers. from the time i was there just -- random citizens just walking into the shelters and donating goods and trying to help their fellow man. it's unfortunate it takes a tragic situation like this to bring the best out of people. host: congressman runyan, what is the best way that the federal government in your view can h
the deaths after katrina were from carbon monoxide poisoning. if you have trouble breathing, should have detector. if you're having trouble breathing or something doesn't seem right, you should get checked out. we're seeing a lot of carbon monoxide poisoning from people who don't sense it. jamie: i thought that the points that you raised were all very important. and we'll put up a full screen folks can have them in the back of their mind if they're feeling symptoms. mold fits in there certainly too with the breathing. hypothermia is something a lot of people are experiencing because of no heat. but contaminated drinking water, i saw portable water fountains breezy point in long island. what is safe to drink right now? >> well there is only boil water advisories in certain areas of new jersey and connecticut. the rest of the areas, even though there's flooding, the water from the tap is safe to drink. general test if you can see through it is usually safe to drink. any food that has been touched by any floodwater or water that is mixed with sueage, that is dangerous. you know, a lot of th
like when the gulf coast area got struck by hurricane katrina. all those trailers turned out to be a real toxic mess. steve centanni live on the jersey shore or near it what's the situation where you are tonight, steve? >> well, shep, i'm n new jersey, a lying area near the bay here that got hit pretty hard. this is an area channels dug in behind the houses where they can pull their boats in. man made lagoons and the water came up 2 feet into their houses. the result after hurricane sandy they had to hall a lot of their household belongs and furniture and carpets out on the street. you see piles like this all through the this neighborhood here. where people had to clean out to what they had now. that was hurricane sandy. that was nine days ago. late summer hurricane. then we had the early nor'easter that came in here. and on top of the debris, they had to throw outside, you got the next part of the story. this thick wet snow that came down overnight about 5 to 6 to 7 inches of it. this pretty much tells the whole story here, trouble on top of trouble here in new jersey, shep?
, new jersey filled with supplies gathered by victims of hurricane katrina. the box car was full of storm relief items, including batteries, diapers, dog food, and will go to residents in hoboken, new jersey, and other hard hit areas nearby. as the relief efforts continue, the will the weather continue? maria molina live with more on that. hi, maria. >> the weather has not really been cooperating a whole lot lately. we had the nor'easter that dumped some snow across portions of the northeast and those areas that were impacted very hard by sandy and very cold temperatures. over the next couple of days, we are going to start to notice a pattern shift with temperatures starting to warm up, especially during the nighttime hours. critical hours when temperatures drop below the freezing mark. take a look at sunday night, 48 degrees will be the low. by monday, a low of 50 degrees. a lot better than what we've been experiencing the last couple of nights. then tuesday into wednesday, we do have a front that does arrive, pushing in much colder air and then the nighttime temperatures in at
after hurricane katrina in my time at the white house and the homeland security staff is that you preposition yourself in the area before the zone is impacted. you do the precoordination, prestage assets, video teleconferencing from the white house with alt federal agencies, putting those resources in place before the storm hits. >> brian: they are out of poles! they don't have enough poles to replace the broken poles. we don't have water or gas. they don't have a plan, they don't have a communications apparatus. i don't understand why your governor is basically hostage to these people! he's acting like an outraged resident where he should be taking action demanding something to change! there are faceless bureaucracy, monopoly that operates without incentives. no kidding. they are before and now after and during. >> some of those precoordination meetings with the national government would be with the emergency operations centers. getting an idea from the state what resources do you have? >> brian: did that take place? >> i have no idea. >> brian: it didn't take place at your level
-- well, except look at the price tag of repairing things after stuff. look at katrina and now sandy. you know, sandy wasn't especially a big hurricane, as hurricanes go. it just happened to get deflected ashore in an inopportune place, and from a geological standpoint, you know, katrina was 2005. sandy is 2012. in a sense of deep time, that's like the blink of an eye. it's just happened like that. if these storms happen every five years, then every four years, this is going to be very expensive and traumatic thing, and that's just in the developed world where we have the means to feed 50,000 people on thanksgiving day, but in developing worlds, it leads to just horrible trauma, and we have huge inefficient sis, and there's going to be conflict over transportation and clean water and who gets the rights to live in the right -- in the most desirable places. this could be a turning point. i am an advocate of doing everything all at once. >> so to both of you as we wrap it up, real quick then, do you believe, the both of you, we're going to see more, larger, begger, more frequent storms as a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)